Har Ki Dun - Swargarohini Peak as visible from the Har Ki Dun meadow
Swargarohini peak as seen from the meadow at Har ki Dun; PC: Abhishek

Har ki Dun, which means Valley of Gods, is situated deep inside Govind Pashu National park in North-Western Uttarakhand. Rich in flora and fauna, the trails are quite often covered in different shades of orchids and other wild flowers. In 1937, Doon school master Jack Gibson along with Tenzing Norgay and his colleague John Martyn climbed Bandarpunch. Jack Gibson made several expeditions in the region and trained young Indian mountaineers. This made the flora, fauna and Garhwali culture of Har ki Dun region known to the outside world.

The path winds up alongside the Tons river from Netwar village. The trek is along the Supin river through the scenic Garhwali villages of Taluka, Gangad and Osla. Har ki dun has numerous camping places and one Forest Guest House. An extra rest day is ideal to explore several trails which continue from the Har ki Dun camp.

From Har ki Dun one can see the entire North Face of Swargarohini I (6,252 m) peak. This face drops to about 2,000 m in less than 2 km distance and is yet to be climbed. The legends associated with it say that Swargarohini is the path to heaven that was followed by Pandavas of the epic Mahabharata. Though, the same story is also associated with the Swargarohini steps seen from Satopanth Lake, which lies ahead of Badrinath.

Approximate terrain profile for Har Ki Dun trek: Distance-Altitude Chart; Source Google Earth Pro. Please note that we return along the same route. Take into account a 5% error margin.
Trekkers' safety and comfort are of the utmost priority to us at Himalaya Shelter. This is reflected in conduct of our treks, through our curteous and experienced staff, our equipment standards, hygiene, and respect for the nature and outdoors. We equally value the fragile nature of biodiversity and thus indulge in organizing minimum impact treks, while ensuring an authentic and complete experience for our trekkers.
  • Our Equipment: We use 4 season tents on all our treks to ensure an added layer of safety. We have high quality tents from premier mountaineering equipment companies such as Simond, Vango and Alps Mountaineering.
  • The A-shape blue tents are custom made according to our needs of four-season rating. They hold sturdy under extreme wind, snow and rain. Each has enough space for 3 men even including their luggage. The fly is also large enough to store extra baggage and shoes.
    These tents are used for fixed departure groups for treks where Mules can ferry the load.
    All tents are double walled with great insulation against cold, wet and damp conditions.
  • Our Sleepings bags are high altitude ready and ensure comfort during cold weather. We take into account hygiene and thus ensure the cleanliness of our sleeping bags.
  • Our Conduct: Our guides are experienced in the outdoors and always put guest safety first, even if that means making tough decisions.
  • We emphazise on localization as being integral to sustainable growth and thus try to the extent possible to use local food products, which in turn provides trekkers an added experience of getting familiar with local cuisine and culture.
  • At Himalaya Shelter we employ locals while organizing treks, and support their training from institutions such as Nehru Institute of Mountaineering, HMI, NOLS etc thus contributing towards rural development through empowering local people.
  • Himalaya Shelter never indulges in setting up of fixed camps which work as achilles heel for the fragile environs of meadows. We urge trekkers to trek responsibly and always raise these concerns with their organizers.

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Find out more about villages of Har Ki Dun

Villages of Har Ki Dun
Villages of Har Ki Dun
Read More

Read about experience of our co traveller from the trek to Har Ki Dun

Valley of Gods - Har Ki Dun
Villages of Har Ki Dun
Read More
  • Way to Sankri - Har Ki Dun
    Way to Sankri; PC: Tania
    Dehradun to Sankri drive

    We start the journey early from Dehradun and drive initially to the famous hill station of Mussoorie. After just over 100 km, we pass close to the temple of Lakhamandal. According to locals, Duryodhana of the epic Mahabharata conspired to burn the Lakshagriha house of the Pandavas in this area. Damta, Purola, Mori and Netwar are some of the other villages on the route. We follow the river Yamuna upstream. The river Kamal Ganga merges with Yamuna near Naugaon and accompanies us till Purola. Purola is the last big settlement on the route with a large market. So, it is recommended that the trekkers can buy anything they might have missed out by Purola itself. It also is the last village where most of the mobile networks work.

    The drive after Purola is through a beautiful forest of pine trees. In some distance, on top of a hill we can see the Jawahar Navodaya Vidyalaya overlooking the valley. From near the village of Mori, the river Tons flows beside us till about Netwar. The fall in temperature can be felt from here. We officially enter Govind Pashu Vihar Wildlife Sanctuary after we cross a check post at Netwar. It can be considered the southern gateway to the sanctuary as most of the treks across the region are accessed from here onwards. The northern border of the sanctuary merges into Himachal Pradesh. Close to here, the rivers of Rupin and Supin merge to form Tons, which is the largest tributary of Yamuna and in fact larger than Yamuna itself, in terms of volume of flow. The peak of Kedarkantha can be seen from various points along the way from here.

    We reach Sankri by early evening. It is a small village with a central market lined with a few shops. The village has numerous apple orchards which are harvested starting from late summer. The market area is new compared to the old village area, a part of which is known as 'Saud'. The village also produces peach, apricots and potatoes. One can see the Swargarohini peak from here on a clear day. We rest at night in a guest house or in camps.

  • Sankri to Seema (2,600 m)

    Since, the journey is long, we start as early as we can in the morning. After breakfast we board an SUV and drive through a forest road. The drive is quite bumpy. The vehicle crosses one or two streams on the way. We reach Taluka in about an hour. It is a small village with a few shops and two Government guest houses. The trek commences from here on a stony path. The fragrance of cedar trees can be felt around Taluka. Sometimes during winters, or especially during periods with rather heavy spells of rain, the road to Taluka may be too dangerous for vehicles, as streams run across the road and thus one may be required to walk a stretch of around 8 km up to Taluka, albeit it is only occasional.

    We walk close to the river Supin gushing through rapids. Under the shade of walnut, pine and cedar trees, the walk is quite pleasant. In autumn we can often find walnuts lying around. One must avoid touching the vegetation on the sides for there are Stinging Nettle plants here locally known as 'Bichhu ghas' which literally translates to 'scorpion grass'. A slight touch can give us stinging sensation which lasts for about twenty to thirty minutes. This herb is also cooked as a vegetable and eaten. Often the passing villagers greet us on the way. High up above on the true left, we get to see the village of Datmer. It is lined by series of step farms. The farms have the bright red colored Cholai growing from late monsoon to early autumn.

    The path crosses over a few streams which merge with Supin. After a few hours of walk the village of Gangad can be seen towards the left, across the river. It is possible to come across a yellow throated marten in the forests of this area. We can also find edible fruits of seabuckthorn. They are orange in color and grow in bunches. Also, known as 'leh berries', the juicy and sour fruits are a rich source of vitamin C. We continue our trek and soon, the quaint village of Osla unfolds itself. One comes across a small hut with a water mill on the right of the trail. Water mills use the power of streams to grind grains and are locally called 'gharaats'. After less than an hour, we reach Seema which is a tiny settlement opposite to the river from Osla. We set camp here.

  • Seema to Har ki Dun (3,510 m)

    Osla is located on a sloping spur about a hundred meters above the river Supin. The landscape surrounding Osla is full of terraced farms. The colors of these lands differ in every season. The red farms of Cholai (Amaranth) look amazing and can be seen from late monsoon. Osla is the last village on the route to Har ki Dun. From Osla the trail gradually rises higher and the river can be seen far below. We come across a temple some distance below the trail towards the right. We pass through bushes of flowers like orchids, fleece flowers and sunflowers. The ascending path climbs high above the confluence of Supin river and the river from Ruinsara valley. From near this confluence, we get a view of the snow-clad peaks of Ruinsara valley including Black Peak, the highest peak in the region. A hidden and roaring waterfall is encountered a little ahead of this point after a short descend. There is a small tea shop beside the waterfall.

    After traversing higher up along the true right of the river, we enter the final stretch which is inside a forest. The forest opens up into the main camping area of Har ki Dun, right beside the gurgling stream. This is a very panoramic spot in Har ki Dun located at the junction of two valleys, one originating from Jaundhar glacier and the other from beyond Hata glacier. Higher up towards the North we can spot the Forest Rest House, while the wood crafted GMVN guest house lies further up in the distance. The Har ki Dun peak stands tall right in front of us behind the Forest Rest House. Towards its left, Hata peak which is usually snow covered can be seen. The minor ridge to our right, lined with a few scattered Himalayan birch trees Bhojpatra separates us from the massive Har Ki Dun valley that goes up all the way to the base of Swargarohini Peak. The paper like bark of these trees was used in ancient times to write religious scriptures. If time permits, we can go for a short walk to near the guest house for a glimpse of the vast meadows and the Swargarohini peak.

  • Explore Har ki Dun

    We can choose to relax and soak in the environment or we have several trails as options.

    The vast open meadows following the course of the Supin river can be explored. Further ahead of the meadows one can walk among the forests of Bhojpatra trees (Himalayan birch) or get a closer glimpse of the Jaundhar glacier and Swargarohini peak, for which we will have to head updwards the Har Ki Dun valley, towards the Swargaroini peak in the eastern direction. It is also possible to walk till the base of Swargarohini peak. Being a long journey for the day, it would require to carry along sufficient food supplies, water and some cloths to aid against an abrupt weather change. The first rays of the sun can be seen falling atop the Swargarohini peak.

    One can visit the Marinda Tal, in the north, just 2-3 km away from Har ki Dun. The trail is gradually ascending here. It is a small lake formed by a huge boulder obstructing the river which flows down from the base of the Borasu Pass.

    The little-known valley of Hata can be explored which lies in between the above two valleys in the North East direction. It also has some large meadows and a close view of the Hata glacier and Hata peak.

  • Har ki Dun to Seema (2,600 m)

    The journey back to Seema is an easy walk. We take the very same route which we used to reach to Har Ki Dun. After the initial descent through the forest we trace back our way towards Kalkatidhar, the rather exposed section of the trek. On the route we come across a good view of the trail all the way to Osla and see the valley descend towards Taluka, around the curve of the ridge where the two streams comng from Har Ki Dun and Ruinsara respectively, converge. A little short of this intersection we can get a glimpse of a trail to our left marked by a sight of a bridge down over the stream. This trail goes to join the trail to Ruinsara lake and is rarely taken. After reaching Osla, one can roam about in the village, talk to locals and soak in the Garhwali culture. Again we can either set camp or stay with a local family.

  • Rainbow at Sankri - Har Ki Dun
    Rainbow at Sankri - September; PC: Abhishek Sohu
    Seema to Sankri

    Early in the morning, we leave the settlement of Seema and trek till Taluka. The walk is downhill and hence takes lesser time than before. We walk to the true left of the River Supin until we finally arrive at Taluka, from where a vehicle takes us back to Sankri. We retire for the day in camp alongside the river or in a guest house in Sankri.

  • Sankri to Dehradun

    The trek to Har ki Dun concludes today as we leave Sankri and reach Dehradun by late afternoon.



    Mammals

  • Langur
  • Wild Fox
  • Indian Crested Porcupine
  • Yellow throated marten
  • Wild boar
  • Black bear
  • Blue Sheep/ Bharal

    Birds

  • Black Francolin
  • Koklass Pheasant
  • Kalij Pheasant
  • Brown-fronted Woodpecker
  • Himalayan Woodpecker
  • Scaly-bellied Woodpecker
  • Great Barbet
  • White-throated Kingfisher
  • Crested Kingfisher
  • Slaty-headed Parakeet
  • Himalayan Swiftlet
  • Snow Pigeon
  • Oriental turtle Dove
  • Black Kite
  • Lammergeier
  • Himalayan Griffon
  • Common Buzzard
  • Black-headed Jay
  • Eurasian Jay
  • Yellow-billed Blue Magpie
  • Red-billed Blue Magpie
  • Red-billed Chough
  • Large-billed Crow
  • Common Raven
  • Spotted Nutcracker
  • Yellow-browed Fantail
  • Bronze Drongo
  • Brown Cipper
  • Blue Whistling Trush
  • Blue-capped Redstart
  • White-capped Water Redstart
  • Plumbeous Water Redstart
  • White-cheeked Nuthatch
  • White-tailed Nuthatch
  • Eurasian Treecreeper
  • Rusty-flanked Treecreeper
  • Rufous-Vented Tit
  • Spot-winged Tit
  • Grey-crested Tit
  • Green-backed Tit
  • Black-throated Tit
  • Black-lored Tit
  • Great Tit
  • Yellow-browed Tit
  • Winter Wren
  • Himalayan Bulbul
  • Red-vented Bulbul
  • Black Bulbul
  • Striated Prinia
  • Lemon-rumped Warbler
  • Tickells's Leaf Warbler
  • Mountain Chiffchaff
  • Oriental White-eye
  • White-throated Laughingthrush
  • Streaked Laughingthrush
  • Black-chinned Babbler
  • White-throated Shrike Babbler
  • White-browed Fulvetta
  • Whiskered Yuhina
  • Rufous Sibia
  • Russet Sparrow
  • Citrine Wagtail
  • Alpine Accentor
  • Plain Mountain finch
  • Red-mantled Rosefinch
  • Rock Bunting
  • Chestnut-eared Bunting
  • Black Peak/Kalanag (6,387 m) (Visible on the way to Har ki Dun from Osla)
  • Swargarohini I (6,252 m), II, III (The entire North Face is prominently visible from Har ki Dun camp)
  • Lower peaks - Har ki Dun peak, Hata peak
  • Yamuna during first and last day's drive.
  • Tons during first and last day's drive.
  • Supin during rest of the days, which originates from the confluence of several streams from Har ki Dun and Ruinsara valley.
  • Taluka to Osla
  • Har Ki Dun Map
  • Osla to Har Ki Dun
  • Har Ki Dun Map

Transport support from and to Dehradun: starting from pickup on day 1 to drop on day 7.

Guide and cook fees.

Rent for camping equipment.

Forest entry charges.

Porter and mule support to carry camping equipment. Please note that personal luggage can be carried by mules and/or porters on chargeable basis.

All veg meals starting from day 1 dinner to day 7 breakfast.

Tented accommodation throughout the trek.

Transport to reach Dehradun from hometown.

Personal expenses like tips, personal medicines, phone calls etc.

Any transport support during the trek apart from what is included above.

Accommodation in Dehradun.

Personal luggage with mass not exceeding 12 kg per bag per person can be carried by porters/mules @ Rs 300 per day per bag. This amounts to a total of Rs 1,500/- per bag for all trekking days.

For a nominal charge of Rs 300 per person per night, we can arrange for Homestay in the village of Osla on request. The amount goes directly to the local family hosting us.

  • Trekking Boots: Waterproof, high ankle with good grip.
  • One Raincoat/Poncho
  • Windproof Jacket
  • Wind & waterproof pant
  • 2-3 t-shirts/shirts – preferably quick dry
  • 2 trousers (avoid shorts, fitting denims, capris)
  • Warm Fleece, Alternative: a woolen sweater
  • Extra pair of socks
  • Trekking Pole
  • Waterproof Rucksack or Rucksack with rain-cover
  • Water Bottle
  • Slippers/Sandals/Floaters: Non-slippery
  • Hat or sun protection cap
  • Woolen cap/scarf
  • Head Torch (hand torch would be an alternative)
  • Sunglasses (it should be UV protected.) or use Photo chromatic glasses.
  • Identitiy cards
  • Personal Toiletries (toothbrush,toothpaste etc)
  • Hand Sanitizer
  • Wet and dry tissues
  • Toilet paper rolls
  • Towel
  • Personal medical kit
  • Sunscreen cream/moisturizer/lip balm
  • Thermal inner wears
  • One pair of woolen socks
  • Waterproof thick gloves
  • Hot water bag if needed
  • Diamox - to prevent AMS
  • Crocin - fever
  • Avomine - (motion sickness)
  • Avil 25mg - (allergies)
  • Combiflam - (Pain killer)
  • Disprin - (headache)
  • Digene - (acidity)
  • Norflox TZ & Lomofen - (diarrhea)
  • ORS
  • Omez/ Rantadine - (antacids)
  • Crepe bandage - 3 to 5 meters
  • Gauze - 1 small roll
  • Band aids - different sizes
  • Cotton - 1 small roll
  • Betadine or any antiseptic cream
  • Moov/Volini spray (aches, & sprains)
  • Knee caps
  • Hot water bag in winter if needed

Kumar N (On Tripadvisor) 08 October 2018

I booked the har ki dun trek through himalaya shelter. Company's founder and our trek leader Mr. Bachan Rana was extremely helpful through out the trek. He taught us from how to cook in the mountains to how to pitch the tents. He was very strict about the hygiene and cleanliness. Since we were on a trek in the mountains, we were not expecting much variety of food but they provided us fruits, soup and whatnot on the trek. On the way to trek, he used to teach us about the local farming and flora and fauna. He took us to the local hidden villages in the mountains and helped us experience the local culture and tradition of pahadi people. He has an experience of 18+ years. If you want to get the actual feel of mountains and safety is your first priority, then Mr. Bachan is the person to contact.

Gunjan 25 June 2018

We contacted Bachan for Har Ki dun trek. As we were a couple, we didn't want to go in a group and wanted some privacy. Our itinerary kept on changing and Bachan very patiently catered and revised his package to our need every time. Finally we took the Dehradun to Dehradun 9 days/8 nights package. Himalaya shelter team who went with us were Surinder (the main person/guide and cook), Mukesh (the porter and assistant to Surinder) and Harish (whose khacchar carried our stuff). We couldn't have asked for a better team! These people were not only efficient at their work but were also lovely human beings. The food was excellent (thanks to Surinder) and we had to actually refuse few times as we were so over full. We took small hikes here and there around Har ki Dun and Mukesh was more than enthusiastic to accompany us anywhere. We had lovely conversations with them and they all are so full of life and laughter. I have a knee problem, so at times my pace became almost non existent, and the team was kind enough to give encouragement to rest and progress slowly. Me and my husband had an absolutely fantastic time in the trek. Thanks Himalaya Shelter for an unforgettable experience!! :)

Avinash M (On Tripadvisor) 15 January 2018

My wife and I undertook the HKD trek with Bachan on Sep 22, 2017. Sadly it was a wet start to the trek and we lost a day to bad weather. However it was here we realised how important a good guide can be. Bachan made it clear that we would not trek in wet weather when we thought it’s just a drizzle. Other groups who did carry on discovered to their misfortune that the roads were in terrible shape and when we encountered many of them returning back next day in terrible shape did we realise our good fortune in opting for a guide of the pedigree of Bachan. The entire crew puts client safety above all. They take utmost care to ensure you are in good spirits; be it the joy of hot tea / soup / noodles / pasta as soon as you reach camp or the ever changing menu over the week. Every person in his team - be it Madan or Jaya or any of the others - is good natured ensures you in good spirits when the going gets tough.. all in all a great experience for us and we would blindly recommend Bachan to anyone thinking of a trek..

Premila (On Tripadvisor) 04 December 2017

We did the Har Ki Dun trek with HIMALAYA SHELTER, we chose them after having read the reviews and recommendations in TRIP ADVISOR and also we do believe in supporting local businesses , so we contacted Himalaya Shelter and they were very accommodating as far as the dates and although we were just three of us they still obliged . It was the most amazing 6 nights /7 days we spent in the mountains .We were so happy and honoured to have the owner Mr Bachan as our guide ,who took care of us and saw that we experienced everything to make our trek very special and unforgetable. All the arrangements were par excellence, the the best local food,comfortable tents ,sleeping bags & blankets that kept us warm even in minus temperature. And staff Harish the chef who kept us well fed and Kailash who saw to all our needs . I would strongly recommend HIMALAYA SHELTER to anyone looking for a very personalized trek as their groups are small, and one experiences the true and warm hospitality of the Pahari people. After all trekking is not only about being in a hurry to reach a destiny its about soaking in the surrounding beauty, stopping to smell the flowers, and interacting with people. Thank you Mr. Bachan Rana for making it possible.


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